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Does anyone have a clutch kit in their 570? I'm wanting to put one in, but would like some feedback from someone who has one. I have a non EBS 570.
 

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gmck154x4
I have the EPI trail clutch and its makes a world of difference. Engages about 2250 rpm. Slow start is much smoother, hammer down fast start is awesome. Engages into the start of the power curve. Engine revs up a little before engaging. Most bang for the buck you can add to any machine. Stock weights are 52 grams and the EPI kit has 54 gram. I guess if you installed 56 gram weights it would be a dragster. The kit comes with springs.
IMO you will be pleased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Again I thank you! Could I borrow $2k so I can buy WE shocks?😅😅😅
 
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Does anybody make a clutch kit that converts the ACE into EBS? I like the higher rpm engagement and that should help offset the horsepower loss with altitude and get things moving a little quicker from a stop.
 

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Does anybody make a clutch kit that converts the ACE into EBS? I like the higher rpm engagement and that should help offset the horsepower loss with altitude and get things moving a little quicker from a stop.
Skyliner Contact RVS performance and Ryan can answer your questions about any available kits to convert to EBS
 

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Does anyone have a clutch kit in their 570? I'm wanting to put one in, but would like some feedback from someone who has one. I have a non EBS 570.
i also installed the epi clutch for the non ebs, i was unhappy with the higher lockup, but it does grab harder and is definetly a difference, im sure the clutch kit will really shine once i can afford an exhaust and a tuner. i will be pulling mine back apart to reinstall the factory spring in my primary clutch to get my clutch lockup back 1900-2000 range, but then again i ride under 3000' elevation. overall i am very pleased with the kit and it was definetly worth the money, but again i wasnt happy with the lock up rpm, it even tells you in their instructions that if you want to drop your clutch lock up 2-300 rpms (which puts it close to factory) you have to order their albino spring. but rather than spend more money on parts im gonna try my factory primary spring and see how it responds to the heavier weights.
 

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You think that locking up at 2200-2500 is high, try riding a powder sled one day. One of mine is tuned to engage at 5000 rpm and the other one is tuned to engage at 4500 rpm. A very agressive buddy once had his tuned to engage at 6500 rpm to get a good hole shot.
 

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You think that locking up at 2200-2500 is high, try riding a powder sled one day. One of mine is tuned to engage at 5000 rpm and the other one is tuned to engage at 4500 rpm. A very agressive buddy once had his tuned to engage at 6500 rpm to get a good hole shot.
I'd say there is a great difference between starting out at 4500 rpm on the snow, compared to doing it on dry ground with tires and not just a belt. I'd say a 4500 rpm starting rpm on an atv would have a great tendency to break things. I may be wrong but I know what happens with a car and some high speed stall convertors, when they engage at too high an rpm. Things start to go bad very quickly, if the rest of the drivetrain isn't beefed to accept the high rpm launches. I can see the same things happening on an atv. But I've never owned a sled. In Tn we don't have a lot of use for them
 
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Actually, the belt takes a bigger beating on the snowmobile than on a vehicle with tires. Sled tracks have a lot of friction/inertia to overcome and engagement rpm must be done close to where the engine is producing at least half of its rated horsepower so engine doesn't bog down. Additionally, in certain riding conditions (powder riding), you need to get that track spinning 40-50mph instantaneously or the sled will trench and you end up going nowhere. It takes a lot of HP to get that hole shot and if not done quickly, the sledder will end up digging his sled out and that isn't easy if you are above 10000 feet ASL. I'm not too hard on my sled belts and usually can count on 500 miles before they shred from abuse, better riders than me can shred a belt each ride if they don't let it rest occasionally. Its so weird seeing a belt smoke when it is -10 deg F outside..hard to keep them things cool when you are going from idle to 8250 rpm in a split second repeatedly. My last Spring ride sucked because the snow was very wet and heavy and outside temps were in the low 50's.......I fried both belts that day and borrowed a spare from a passerby to get back up over the Continental Divide (12,127 feet) and back to the trailhead 25 miles away.

This is why all sleds have a dedicated spot, usually under the hood, for a spare belt. I have yet to find that in any ATV ;-)
 

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Actually, the belt takes a bigger beating on the snowmobile than on a vehicle with tires. Sled tracks have a lot of friction/inertia to overcome and engagement rpm must be done close to where the engine is producing at least half of its rated horsepower so engine doesn't bog down. Additionally, in certain riding conditions (powder riding), you need to get that track spinning 40-50mph instantaneously or the sled will trench and you end up going nowhere. It takes a lot of HP to get that hole shot and if not done quickly, the sledder will end up digging his sled out and that isn't easy if you are above 10000 feet ASL. I'm not too hard on my sled belts and usually can count on 500 miles before they shred from abuse, better riders than me can shred a belt each ride if they don't let it rest occasionally. Its so weird seeing a belt smoke when it is -10 deg F outside..hard to keep them things cool when you are going from idle to 8250 rpm in a split second repeatedly. My last Spring ride sucked because the snow was very wet and heavy and outside temps were in the low 50's.......I fried both belts that day and borrowed a spare from a passerby to get back up over the Continental Divide (12,127 feet) and back to the trailhead 25 miles away.

This is why all sleds have a dedicated spot, usually under the hood, for a spare belt. I have yet to find that in any ATV ;-)
Skyliner, I was thinking about the difference between engaging tracks and engaging axles at such high rpm, since a sled doesn't have the same running gear as an atv, and those kinds of starts on a quad would break all kinds of stuff, quickly
 
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