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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will be taking the Ace to the dealer for the 100 hour service in few days and I am building a list of things that I want checked out. Two weeks ago Greybeard and One-Shot were at my house for a few days of riding. They both brought their RZRs. When it was 45 degrees or colder, my Ace would hardly start. It would turn over easily. I would crank on it 5-10 seconds and then give the starter a brief rest. Sometime it took four of five of those cycles for the Ace to start. The RZR 570 and the RZR 900 would fire right up in the cold weather. The coldest day was around 35 and I thought I was going to have to push the Ace into the garage and warm it up with a heater before it would start. I would turn the key and wait until the fuel pump cycled before I tried to start it. Does anyone have any ideas about why this happens?
 

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I will be taking the Ace to the dealer for the 100 hour service in few days and I am building a list of things that I want checked out. Two weeks ago Greybeard and One-Shot were at my house for a few days of riding. They both brought their RZRs. When it was 45 degrees or colder, my Ace would hardly start. It would turn over easily. I would crank on it 5-10 seconds and then give the starter a brief rest. Sometime it took four of five of those cycles for the Ace to start. The RZR 570 and the RZR 900 would fire right up in the cold weather. The coldest day was around 35 and I thought I was going to have to push the Ace into the garage and warm it up with a heater before it would start. I would turn the key and wait until the fuel pump cycled before I tried to start it. Does anyone have any ideas about why this happens?
You don't suppose that you may have gotten some bad gas Hayseed. Mine starts the same at 35 or 135.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses. I bought fresh gasoline today. I have had two carburetors on lawn equipment replaced supposedly because of ethanol damage so I only use premium fuel. This was at the recommendation of the mechanic who replaced the carburetors on my lawn equipment. I really have no idea whether or not it is worth the extra cost. I have a 30 gallon fuel caddy for my lawn equipment and OHVs and use STA-BIL in the fuel. I will put fresh gasoline in the Ace tomorrow and start it Sunday morning. It is supposed to be 33 here so if it is fuel that should tell the tale. I do have the original spark plug still in the Ace and plan to replace it at the 100 hour service. I may go to the dealer tomorrow and buy a fresh spark plug also. The Ace runs great once it is started and starts beautifully in warm weather. Any other ideas?
 

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change the plug ......................seriously
last week my brothers atv would not start at all , after sitting for just a few hours in below zero weather .
Ran and started perfect at 11pm the night before . WENT TO START IN MORNING AND WOULD ONLY SPUTTER THAN STALL.
He was convinced the ecu or coil died .
I told him change the plug , Bingo , ran like a top again .
It is easy to foul a plug actually and they never recover from it .
Unless you bought special fuel , at like 6 bucks a gallon , all gas including premium is Ethanol added fuel , ethanol is hydroscopic . It absorbs moisture from the air when it sits .
Dry gas addditive like Heet or Sea Foam is your friend if you are going to store gas with ethanol in it .
 

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Hayseed, get rid of the STA-BIL and get either Seafoam or Starbrite. STA-BIL caused me several thousand $$$$ damage to an injection system in our car and the dealer and his mechanics all said it was the STA-BIL that caused the damage. After switching to Seafoam, I have not had any more problems.

Also, around our neck of the woods, ethanol is only used in regular, not in premium fuels. Also, many stations sell NON-ethanol regular for 5¢ gallon higher than the regular with ethanol. Also, Mavrick stations in our area do NOT add ethanol to any of their fuel.
 

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Thanks for the responses. I bought fresh gasoline today. I have had two carburetors on lawn equipment replaced supposedly because of ethanol damage so I only use premium fuel. This was at the recommendation of the mechanic who replaced the carburetors on my lawn equipment. I really have no idea whether or not it is worth the extra cost. I have a 30 gallon fuel caddy for my lawn equipment and OHVs and use STA-BIL in the fuel. I will put fresh gasoline in the Ace tomorrow and start it Sunday morning. It is supposed to be 33 here so if it is fuel that should tell the tale. I do have the original spark plug still in the Ace and plan to replace it at the 100 hour service. I may go to the dealer tomorrow and buy a fresh spark plug also. The Ace runs great once it is started and starts beautifully in warm weather. Any other ideas?
Hayseed
Here premium gas as well as regular grades all still have 10% ethanol so switching to premium would not help me at all with an ethanol problem. Check to make sure your premium is ethanol free before spending the extra $s on premium. Also if you use your ACE on a regular basis, the small amount of ethanol shouldn't hurt it at all. It's just when you leave one sitting for months on end without using it will problems most likely occur. You may have gotten some gas with a little water in it. I also agree with Mustang....with 100 hours I would change the plug
 

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Hayseed, get rid of the STA-BIL and get either Seafoam or Starbrite. STA-BIL caused me several thousand $$$$ damage to an injection system in our car and the dealer and his mechanics all said it was the STA-BIL that caused the damage. After switching to Seafoam, I have not had any more problems.

Also, around our neck of the woods, ethanol is only used in regular, not in premium fuels. Also, many stations sell NON-ethanol regular for 5¢ gallon higher than the regular with ethanol. Also, Mavrick stations in our area do NOT add ethanol to any of their fuel.
I wish we had a choice .............here in New England you get ethanol blended gas at 10 % period , no options . Unless you go buy special off road fuel .
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just picked up two spark plugs from the dealer and a quart of Sea Foam to add to my 30 gallon tank of gasoline that I bought yesterday. I checked the gap on one plug and will install it later today. It is supposed to be 33 on Sunday morning so I will try and start the Ace on Sunday after the plug change. I only like to change one thing at a time. The gasoline in the Ace was bought directly from a station and did not come from my gasoline caddy. I am down to two bars on the fuel gauge and I will run it down lower and refill with gasoline with Sea Foam if the spark plug does not fix the problem. If neither fixes the problem, then I will have the dealer try and diagnose it.

There are stations in the area that sell fuel without ethanol. They are primarily near the lakes as many boat motors, particularly older models, do not like ethanol. The nearest one is about 25 miles but if this continues to be a problem I will make the trip and buy the non-ethanol fuel for the Ace.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I got a new spark plug in the Ace tonight, barely. I started it and it ran great. I will repeat this the next cold morning to see if it fixed the problem. Below is a photo of my old plug and a new plug.

View attachment 2822

The plug actually looks pretty good as far as oil and soot. I could not see that it was fouled much at all. However, notice the short earth electrode. It is barely over the central electrode. The end of the earth electrode is squared and not burned away so it appears to me that it was manufactured this way. The new plug in the photo is not much better. The earth electrode extends almost to the center of the central electrode. Fortunately, I bought two plugs at the dealer today. The plug that I installed in the ace had what I consider a good earth electrode. It completely covered the central electrode. These plugs are Champion RG6YC. I am going to try and find a better quality spark plug. All advice is appreciated.

The remainder of this post documents my struggles finding and replacing the spark plug. You experienced Polaris guys will probably not find this helpful. Some amateurs like me might find a nugget or two that is worth the reading.

The instruction on page 93 of my owner's manual list these steps to remove a spark plug.

1) Remove the cargo box access panel

2) Remove the spark plug cap

3) Using the spark plug wrench provided in the tool kit, remove the plug by rotating it counter-clockwise.

After reading step 1, I removed my rear cargo box and removed the access panel located underneath the cargo box. I could see no spark plug. In fact, you can hardly see or touch the top of the engine from this access panel. I finally located the spark plug by removing the seat and removing the engine compartment panel that is located behind the seat. From there you can get to the spark plug, if you know where to look.

It took me a long time to even find the location of the spark plug. I would study the Ace for a while and then do research. I finally pieced together enough tidbits that I took a chance and started pulling rubber and wire from the engine. Below is a diagram of the spark plug wire for the Ace from the Polaris website.

View attachment 2824

The right portion of the diagram is wire loom. It had a label on the outside of the wire loom that said PTO. I grew up driving tractors and that wire did not look anything like a PTO on a tractor. After a lot of research, I finally realized that historically in two cylinder Polaris engines the spark plug wires were labeled PTO (the clutch side) or MAG (the magneto side). I found this reference in a snowmobile article. The wire covered in loom that is labeled PTO is the spark plug wire.

That portion of the diagram that I have circled in red is all soft rubber material. I suppose that is what is called the spark plug cap in the owner's manual. It is about four inches long. It inserts into the center of the top of the motor. I would call it the valve cover but on a double overhead cam engine I don't really know what the top of the engine is called. The spark plug wire runs down through the center of this rubber assembly. First I damaged the rubber assembly with a screw driver trying to pry it off. I was finally able to grip it with some pliers and lift it off the spark plug. Then when I was retrieving the spark plug wrench from my tool kit, I spotted the spark plug wrench handle and the light finally dawned in my brain, too late of course.

Below is a photo of the spark plug wrench and handle. The are both five inches long.

View attachment 2825

The "U" shaped cutout in the handle is used to pry the spark plug cap loose from the spark plug.

View attachment 2826

It fits under the highlighted rubber lip on the spark plug cap and lifts it off the spark plug easily. I put the cap back on and pried it off with the handle to make sure it worked. The highlighted lip sits on top of the engine valve cover. That portion below the highlighted lip is inside the valve cover.

The top of the spark plug is about two inches below the valve cover. I was concerned how I would get the plug up out of the shaft that it sits in. It turns out that the spark plug wrench has a rubber insert that friction grips the top of the spark plug and lifts it out with the wrench.

Good luck when you try to torque the spark plug to 7.5 ft. lbs. I think that the Polaris spark plug tool is the only thing that I could get down to the plug. It has a hex end on top that is designed to accommodate an open end wrench. I could not get my torque wrench to work with it. I will try to fit a socket over the end of it tomorrow but I don't know if there is enough clearance to get a torque wrench in there.
 

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Yikes, that sounds like a PITA.
I'm still on my stock plugs in the RZR. Some guys say they've gotten 8000 miles on them and still going strong.
Not looking forward to messing with them in either the RZR or the ACE.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Scoundrel, it was a PITA the first time. Now that I know what to do it will be easy the second time. It was 43 here this morning. That was well below the temperature that I was having all the problems with starting the Ace. It fired right up quicker than it ever has. It does appear that my problem was the spark plug. Thanks to everyone for their help. Now I am on a mission to find a spark plug that has more consistency in their manufacturing process. This episode was the first time that I have tried to start the Ace in cold weather. I think the plug was defective from the beginning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have been reading all the technical articles that I could find on spark plugs. I owe Champion Spark Plugs an apology. I stated earlier that I thought the short earth electrode was a manufacturing quality problem. It turns out it is short by design. This causes the spark to flow between the tip of the earth electrode and the central electrode. It flows in an arc and ignites the fuel more efficiently. If the earth electrode completely extends over the central electrode, the spark flows directly between the two electrodes and does not arc as much and does not ignite the fuel as efficiently. Champion even makes a performance line of plugs that has a shorter earth electrode. I am 70 years old and I still assume things sometime in the absence of facts. My apologies to the forum.
 
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