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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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My new Lexan windshield is ready to peel of it's protective skin. I gave it a real nice fit that follows the curves of the dashboard perfectly. Approximate cost is $25.00 and is true 1/8 " thick Lexan material.
 

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That's something I've wanted to try too. How are you going to attach it to the frame? I haven't figured that one out yet. Are you going to put some kind of gasket where it meets the dash on the bottom?
 

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The only reasons I didn't do that myself is I don't think the Lexan you get in the local hardware store has the UV and scratch resistance on it.
At that price they're cheap to replace, but you might have to replace them more often without the protective coating.
Also the bend at the top helps with stiffness so the thing does not bow. I don't have the skills/equipment to bend Lexan.

Lexan Margard Cut Sheet
"This Lexan Margard sheet has maximum toughness, with mar resistance approaching that of glass, and significantly improved resistance to weathering. MR-10 sheet provides extended service life. It has excellent clarity and durability, it is lightweight, and is superior glazing material for institutions, office buildings, stores, and more. It will withstand -40deg F to 270 deg F. and has a silicone hard-coat surface. It is non-formable and UV resistant. LEXAN MR10 sheet is mar- and graffiti-resistant. It combines the impact strength of LEXAN polycarbonate sheet with a proprietary abrasion and UV-resistant MARGARD II surface."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's something I've wanted to try too. How are you going to attach it to the frame? I haven't figured that one out yet. Are you going to put some kind of gasket where it meets the dash on the bottom?
I am going to put a gasket of sorts at the bottom and I will be attaching with a combination of Induustrial Velcro and wire ties. Anywhere that the Lexan meets metal will have a gasket between them to allow for wiggling and vibration.
 

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Your local auto parts store sells rubber gaskets that will just slip right on there. You just buy a few feet and cut it to length. I'd suggest a little glue.
 

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you can get the coated stuff locally at places like tap plastics and others...not really going to find it at home depot and the like.
 

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Wonder how much it costs?
At some point, if fabrication is not your daily business or hobby, it stops being worthwhile to buy and cut your own vs. paying a vendor for a full kit.
 

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not sure on cost.
I totally agree about the cost to build vs buy. I am used to the hot rod market where things don't fit, aren't made, cost too much, or you just plain want something custom, so I am always willing to give it a shot myself. Plus I like to be able to say 'I built that' if someone asks about something they see on my car or anything else. Because of this I have acquired many tools that a lot of people would never own and not use them for business.
 

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I also have acquired over the years many tools and skills, I like building but have to agree that sometimes it doesn't make financial sense if your not building and using the tools on a semi regular basis or don't have the skills/experience to do so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
not sure on cost.
I totally agree about the cost to build vs buy. I am used to the hot rod market where things don't fit, aren't made, cost too much, or you just plain want something custom, so I am always willing to give it a shot myself. Plus I like to be able to say 'I built that' if someone asks about something they see on my car or anything else. Because of this I have acquired many tools that a lot of people would never own and not use them for business.
Exactly! there is nothing better than being able to say I made it myself. I too as you have acquired or made tools for just one time use and people ask how did you cut that or how did you put that on and it gave you a feeling of self accomplishment when I said I had to make the tool to make the part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
not sure on cost.
I totally agree about the cost to build vs buy. I am used to the hot rod market where things don't fit, aren't made, cost too much, or you just plain want something custom, so I am always willing to give it a shot myself. Plus I like to be able to say 'I built that' if someone asks about something they see on my car or anything else. Because of this I have acquired many tools that a lot of people would never own and not use them for business.
Maybe we could share tools some time. I have had a very unique career building vehicles for our fellow military and fema. These vehicles are different all the time, they never tell us the exactly how they are using these things and we just take care of their needs the way they want. We are constantly making new tools and sometimes we use them more than once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wonder how much it costs?
At some point, if fabrication is not your daily business or hobby, it stops being worthwhile to buy and cut your own vs. paying a vendor for a full kit.
That's right and its up to the person who owns the machine to pay or play. Not everyone can make their own and not everyone can afford to buy one.
 

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Funny, I was going to try and build my own lock-in ride toolbox by vacuum forming some plastic around a wooden mold or maybe even fiberglass. I also was going to purchase some automotive safety glass and try to plasma cut a two-part frame around it for the windshield. Then I realized my interest rate on my cc is 0%…. So now all that's left is fender flares, a top, skid plate, a-arm guards, and I need to finish the nerd bars. Also I was wondering if I could dress up my rims with some fancy hubcaps from some aluminum, I always get stuck on how to attach the stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Maybe think of strong adhesives or as I love so much..Velcro too. I think you should make hubcaps for sure. I like the sponges that you can insert into deep dish rims but not all rims have the depth to hold them. You might try just flat aluminum discs with a creative way to mount them?/ I want some for my factory rims but like you I just aint sure which direction to go.
 

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hubcap ideas make me want to mess with metal spinning. I have a lathe...just need to build the wood buck and make a tool post to use the hand tools properly.
A friend of mine builds gas tanks, fairings, and other fiberglass parts for cafe racer type motorcycles. He helped a guy do a vacuum formed carbon fiber body for a small race car he is building from scratch. I machined some various parts for it as well. And the 3 of us did a weird project building up some 2-stroke one man auger systems for high elevation mineral exploration. I used my CNC mill to do port work to the motors and used my laser to cut replacement gaskets for them.
Pretty cool what can be done with some ideas and hard work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Awesome!

I guess im not the last of the forget buying it ill make it guys. This morning I thought of you and my wacky idea suggestion when I was sitting at a red light and some car came by with flat faced wheel covers of some sort with just a Chrysler logo on it! I was like, that's what me and 70 were talking about last night.
 
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