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After seeing a post of a 570 with a top speed of 53 mph, I began to wonder at what rpms are the Ace 325 and the Ace 570 rated. If the Ace 325 has 32hp at 5000 rpm, it could have 43 hp at 7000 prm. I'm assuming the 32 hp is rated at the highest rpm. My Ace 325 can reach 7000+ rpm, does the 570 do the same or does the 570 have more torque and thus the 44 hp is reached at a lower rpm.
 

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My 570 Ace will run 56+ with stock tires running slight uphill grade and windshield. Was still accelerating when I let off. I never looked at the rpm. I think they are limited around 7550 rpm from what I read on the RZR forum.
 

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I hit 63 on my 570, stock tires on a gravel road. Poly roof only, no windshield.
 

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After seeing a post of a 570 with a top speed of 53 mph, I began to wonder at what rpms are the Ace 325 and the Ace 570 rated. If the Ace 325 has 32hp at 5000 rpm, it could have 43 hp at 7000 prm. I'm assuming the 32 hp is rated at the highest rpm. My Ace 325 can reach 7000+ rpm, does the 570 do the same or does the 570 have more torque and thus the 44 hp is reached at a lower rpm.
Here is a thread with a dyno video and chart: http://www.aceforums.net/forum/9-ace-talk/148-ace-dyno-video.html
Down at the bottom of that thread there is a second dyno chart: http://www.aceforums.net/forum/9-ace-talk/148-ace-dyno-video.html#post4713

Ah, but looking closer, those charts measure HP and speed, but do not say what the RPMs were at each point.
 

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After seeing a post of a 570 with a top speed of 53 mph, I began to wonder at what rpms are the Ace 325 and the Ace 570 rated. If the Ace 325 has 32hp at 5000 rpm, it could have 43 hp at 7000 prm. I'm assuming the 32 hp is rated at the highest rpm. My Ace 325 can reach 7000+ rpm, does the 570 do the same or does the 570 have more torque and thus the 44 hp is reached at a lower rpm.
Just because an engine can run 7000 rpm does not mean that its making more hp than at 5000 rpm, All engines reach their maximum hp wherever the sweet spot is in the rpm range, and adding more rpm can actually decrease the maximum hp. This is why engines give maximum hp figures at a certain rpm, and that rpm is usually below what the max rpm of the engine is. I just got a voodoo blue 570 Ace last week an can assure you it will run 53 mph and not even complain. I'm breaking mine in and haven't made a WOT run yet but have been over 50 with ease at just part throttle
 

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Just because an engine can run 7000 rpm does not mean that its making more hp than at 5000 rpm, All engines reach their maximum hp wherever the sweet spot is in the rpm range, and adding more rpm can actually decrease the maximum hp. This is why engines give maximum hp figures at a certain rpm, and that rpm is usually below what the max rpm of the engine is. I just got a voodoo blue 570 Ace last week an can assure you it will run 53 mph and not even complain. I'm breaking mine in and haven't made a WOT run yet but have been over 50 with ease at just part throttle
Break it in easy and you'll have a weak engine. For the love of God, please go WOT ASAP for short bursts to get proper ring seal. Been doing this for years on all my engines, cars, trucks, dirt bikes, ATVs, snowmobiles, and my rides are usually faster (never slower) than identical engines that were broken in "by the book". Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power <-- Make sure engine is warmed up first and doesn't hurt for belt to be warmed up but belts are cheaper than engines so I don't give the belt much consideration on a new engine.
 

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How do these vehicles compare in longevity (how many thousands of miles) to vehicles that were broken in gently? Or, do you never keep them long enough to find out?
And why would every manufacturer recommend a gentle break-in, if there were no tangible benefit to be gained from it, only the negative effect of a weak engine?
 

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The manufacturer recommends a "gentle" breakin period because of their legal beagles, not because it is the best. In fact, I had a GM engineer tell me that the best way to break in a new car was to drive it home from the dealer the way you planned to drive it forever.
 

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That does make sense (about the legal beagles). But why would the legal beagles insist on it, if a less gentle break-in did not tend to cause damage to a significant percentage of the product?
 

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It only takes a few short full throttle bursts to seal the rings in is what these guys are saying. Sustained full throttle operation of a new motor should be avoided and is what the eagle beagles are worried about. As long as there is enough cylinder pressure to make the rings seal up it will be fine as far as power and oil consumption is concerned. If you buy a demo model you can almost be assured that the rings are seated. LOL

I have read on pickup truck forums that the gentle break in is actually for the differential gears more so than the motor on those vehicles. I think some of them say not to pull any heavy loads for the first few hundred miles.
 

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I have read on pickup truck forums that the gentle break in is actually for the differential gears more so than the motor on those vehicles. I think some of them say not to pull any heavy loads for the first few hundred miles.
My GMC manual was very specific about not towing for the first 500 miles. I imagine it's hard on the whole engine and drivetrain.
 

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Read the mototune usa link I had in my previous post, it explains everything you need to know and explains it with an easy to understand explanation.

How many of you bed your brakes? The Ace manual says to take it easy on the brakes for a while on a new rig. Baloney, if you do that you'll get a nice glaze on your pads. The key is like engine loading, hard breaking from high speeds to low speeds with a LONG cooldown and then repeat until desired brake feel is obtained. Here is what I used to bed my brakes in http://brakeperformance.com/bedding-in-rotors.

Break-in tip: Its your rig and do what you want with it.

Regarding towing and a new vehicle: BULLSHAT! A friend of mine drivers his own rig OTR and is an owner-operator: He isn't making money unless is on the road. You think he is going to wait 500 or a 1000 miles before he hooks up a 25-ton load? Nope, after he warmed up his engine he did multiple runs similar to what mototune usa break in espouses. He then hooked up an empty trailer and did it again. He changed his oil and went out on his first trip. His rig is driven about 10,000 miles a month and now has 1.3 million miles on it and he hasn't touched the engine yet.

I bought a new F150 ecoboost out of state earlier this year. I drove my Jeep out to pick it up and towed it back on a dolly after I did several break in runs. I've got 17,000 miles on the rig now and expect to get many more miles on it.

My oldest vehicle is my Jeep Liberty CRD. It has only 140,000 miles and runs like new. My previous vehicle was a Nissan Stanza with 2.4L 4 banger. I had 220,000 miles on it when I sold it to a college student. She has over 300k on it and the only thing she had to do was replace a plastic timing chain tensioner, replace a thermostat, and repair a broken window regulator since she got it from me a long time ago.

My last snowmobile was a 99 RMK 700. I had a little over 6500 miles on it when I sold it 3 years ago. It never had anything done to it-not even a top end and still had excellent compression. My wife's 98 RMK 600 had 4000 miles on it and I expect it to last 10k before it needs a top end. My 2014 RMK 800 Pro only has 300 miles but give me 10-15 years and I'll let you know how long it lasts before a top end-the 800's are notorious for needing new piston/rings at 1500 miles.

My generator is used 80 hours/week when I camp and I camp 4 weeks/year. I have well over 1,000 hours on this cheap Chinese engine and it runs like new. It was broken in with varied engine (electrical) load to ensure engine was loaded thoroughly throughout its load and rpm range before I allowed it to run continuously at a constant load.

I'm not saying to abuse an engine. Constant steady state loading (engine load and rpm setting) are very bad for a new engine and all I'm suggesting is to run the engine through its rpm/load range to get a good piston/ring seal. READ MOTOTUNE USA WEBSITE for explanation.

So, if you start burning oil between oil changes when you got some miles on your engine, you'll know what you did wrong.

A demo model (car, ATV, uTV etc) is probably a great purchase. Most demo rides are short in duration and are ridden fairly hard-GOOD.
 

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Ever seen how F1 breaks in an engine? They time trial it vs. What it should do and then call it a day when it hits the time marks that it should hit.
 

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Skyliner....I have given my 570 short bursts of WOT just haven't held it at WOT. I believe varying speeds and rpms are the best way to break in an engine, and yes short WOT bursts are part of the varying process. Its always worked for me on all my vehicles and at my age I'm too old to change and really see no reason to. Thanks for your comments. Trail riding is a great way to break one in
 

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Ever seen how F1 breaks in an engine? They time trial it vs. What it should do and then call it a day when it hits the time marks that it should hit.
Formula 1® - The Official F1® Website - Features - A racing revolution? Understanding 2014's technical regulations
"Last year each driver could use eight engines before incurring a penalty. This year it’s slightly more complicated: the power unit is deemed to consist of six separate elements: (1) the engine, (2) the motor generator unit-kinetic (MGU-K), (3) the motor generator unit-heat (MGU-H), (4) the energy store (ES), (5) the turbocharger (TC) and (6) the control electronics (CE). Should a driver use more than five of any one component during the season he faces a penalty ranging from a five-place grid drop to starting the race from the pit lane."

Just sayin.
 

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Skyliner....I have given my 570 short bursts of WOT just haven't held it at WOT. I believe varying speeds and rpms are the best way to break in an engine, and yes short WOT bursts are part of the varying process. Its always worked for me on all my vehicles and at my age I'm too old to change and really see no reason to. Thanks for your comments. Trail riding is a great way to break one in
You did it right! Holding any throttle setting on a new engine is bad for it whether it is a low, partial, or high WFO throttle position.

For vehicles the only rule I followed strictly was no cruise control for first 1,000 miles. My diesels took up to 25,000-40,000 miles to develop full compression-often a 50 psi increase from a new engine.
 
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