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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I wanted to preface this with saying that this is my first ATV, UTV whatever we call the Ace.

I have never driven anything that was not a go kart, or that had different speeds etc.

Several questions.

1. What display mode do you drive in or pay most attention to? RPM, temp?
2. What is a healthy MPH, TEMP and RPM for Low gear and when should you use HIGH gear?
3. Is starting in High gear a big no-no if your terrain does not allow you to open the throttle?
4. Am I shifting correctly by stopping the vehicle before moving to high gear? Cant do this while in mition correct?
5. Is driving in high gear at low speed bad for you belt?

Please describe your throttle control using a narrative.

Example #1: I start my Ace in low gear because of the winding dirt road, but as I aproach a new trail that has long strait runs, I stop the Ace, shift to high gear and go open throttle.

Example #2: I finish the long straitaways, but decease soeed over the now rougher terrain, I stop the Ace and shift to low gear since the trail is now technical.

Example #3. As the technical trail ends, up next us a steep hill climb with large rocks. The hill demands power, but the speed will be slow. After stipp i ng the Ace, I shift to low, and push the throttle to 5000 rpm.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I always watch engine temp mostly on my Ace (my preference as I always like to make sure the engine is up to temp before riding it and so I know the fan is working when I need it) once in a while I watch RPMs. On my Ace 176 degrees is the normal warmed up temp since it has been broke in. All three examples you gave you are doing the right thing. Driving the Ace in high gear at low speeds will hour glass the belt over time. Low gear is designed so that it will not allow the Ace to go over 25 to 30 mph so you are not abusing low gear. You are correct always stop the Ace before switching gears or you will hear the dreaded metal grinding gear noise.

Example one when I climb hills or anything steep or technical I use low gear.

Example two riding around the house on narrow hilly trails I use low gear

Example three riding trails like old railroad grades and long flats I run high gear

Like I said in your examples you are doing everything right.

Hope this helps.
 

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I'll answer more later (gotta run out the door), but here are my thoughts on belt burn:

This very topic has been discussed many times, many ways on other forums I've been on, and the bottom line is that there is no single right/wrong which covers every situation.
Different vehicle types and weights, different riding styles, different terrain, different clutches will all affect this.
You have to understand what screws up belts, and make your own choice based on each situation you encounter.
It's just another driving decision you make, like when to turn the wheel and which rocks will fit under your rig and which ones you go around.

But you can't write a complicated set of "in this case do this and in that case do that" in a user manual. For one thing, users won't bother to read it if it's long. For another, it might confuse people.
So manufacturers use 20-25mph as a guideline.

So now I'll tell you what I do. And I have never burned out a belt.
I've only been riding since 2005, but I rode more in that time than a lot of guys have ever ridden.
I have put many thousands of miles on CVT transmission quads, and had many different models.

I'll summarize this by saying "don't make the clutch work hard". It's as simple as that.

If I am cruising on a fairly level trail, I'm usually in high gear, even if I'm going 10-15mph, because the clutch is not working hard. I'm just tooling along, foot/thumb barely on the gas.
If the trail starts going uphill, but not really steep, I stay in high gear until I start to feel the machine really start working hard. Then I'll stop, shift to L, and proceed.
If I'm looking at a fairly short hill climb and there's a good run-up, I'll keep it in H.
If I am at the base of a long steep hill climb, I'll stop and put it in L, and then proceed.
If I'm looking at entering a liquid mud puddle, I'll keep it in H (with AWD on before I enter it).
If I'm looking at entering a thick gooey mud pit, I'll put it in L with AWD on before I enter it.

If I go through deep water and I can feel the belt slipping after I get out, I'll stop and drain the water out of the CVT area.
All of my rigs have had CVT drain plugs - even the ones that didn't come stock with one. But these days I try to just stay out of the water for the most part.

It's all about how hard you make that clutch work, and for how long.
 

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1. What display mode do you drive in or pay most attention to? RPM, temp?
2. What is a healthy MPH, TEMP and RPM for Low gear and when should you use HIGH gear?
3. Is starting in High gear a big no-no if your terrain does not allow you to open the throttle?
4. Am I shifting correctly by stopping the vehicle before moving to high gear? Cant do this while in mition correct?
5. Is driving in high gear at low speed bad for you belt?
First, you should understand that these things are engineered for the lowest common denominator. Polaris makes them as tough as they can knowing that idiots will be driving them. So while your concern is not unwarranted, maybe you needn't be overly concerned. Don't let it get in the way of your enjoyment of the vehicle.

1. I pay the most attention to the clock and the number of miles I've driven. The rest is fairly unimportant for routine riding unless you are in a special circumstance and need to troubleshoot/baby your machine. You might need to do that if a warning light comes on, or it's been overheating, or you're hearing a new, strange noise or something. Otherwise, just drive it!

2. See my above post regarding belt burn (copied from another thread).

3. I think so, yes. I did not cover that in my belt burn post, but it's a good point. If you're stuck in the mud or your tire is up against a rock or log, and you use high gear to try and overcome the obstacle, you're likely to prematurely wear your belt. that falls under the category of "making it work too hard".

4. Yes, the vehicle motion should be stopped before you switch from any of the gears (P/R/N/H/L) to any other. otherwise you'll grind/pop the gears which can break chips off of them and tear them apart. That being said, the ACE is sometimes a little tricky with Reverse. If you miss a shift, let it wind down and then try again. If you hear a small amount of ticking or even accidentally grind/pop it now and then, don't freak out, it's probably OK but try to minimize this. If you are concerned, change the fluids in the tranny and drag a magnet through the old fluid. if you find chunks or excessive shavings, check with your dealer. but micro-fine shavings that you can barely see are normal especially for the first fluid change.

2WD/AWD is an exception to this rule. You can flip that switch anytime you want to, moving or not. It has a safety interlock so if you flip it while in motion, it will wait until you slow down to a certain speed before engaging the AWD system. You'll notice the the indicator in the console doesn't go on until it's ready. Once the indicator is on, it's ready to engage the front diff lock when it sense the rear wheels slipping. And it will unlock when you're done slipping.

I have noticed my ACE will bind up occasionally after being in AWD. I can feel some resistance from the front end when I should not be needing AWD. When that happens I stop, flip the switch off, reverse about 15 feet, and then it's all cleared up. This is a known issue with the Polaris AWD system, and is not an indication that your machine is broken. It's just a side effect.

5. Not if you are going downhill. If you're on level ground, define "low speed". If you're crawling along and the belt is barely engaging, and a tortoise could overtake you, then you should probably be in low gear. But if you're cruising, and the RPMs are not high, things are just rolling along easily, then no problem. Again, as mentioned in the belt burn post above, just don't make the machine work too hard.
 

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Great stuff
Drive it like you stole it. If you find a hill steep enough to have to use low range only, with the 570, you probably shouldn't be trying it. The 570 will climb like a billygoat in either gear and has enough torque to climb some hills in high where the 330 will not. All kidding aside, use low when its very steep and no run up to the hill. If it has a decent run up leave it in high and go for it. The 570 has plenty of power and torque to make some bad hills look easy. I usually only watch the tach since mine didn't come with a temperature gauge. Polaris gave me a free one year extended warranty and that's the only reason that I have it
 

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I watch the temperature gauge, especially once I turn it off. A friend showed me how the fan will run if the key is in the on position, this was great during the break-in period and one warm weekend also when I was running on the dunes. I will check the air filter often, change the oil regularly, keep it in heated storage, wash it often, use fuel treatment grease it, etc. but I've decided I'm gonna run this baby like a scared rabbit. I put it in high gear unless in climbing a steep hill or taking the kids around the yard because chances are I'm gonna hit full speed. I've been out of the sport for along time so I've got some fun to catch! (Thats why I built the bumpers, ha ha!) I doubt I'll be "drag racing" and I'm gonna try to let the belt warm up each time before I hammer it. I'll let you know in a year how it works out for me… I'm also NOT purchasing the extend warranty.
 
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