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Was thinking about the 2.0's. Are they not as good? Definitely need an all-around tire. Our parks have sand, mud, rocks, woods, creeks...
 

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Discussion Starter #22
The 2.0 model weighs less, because it has fewer layers of rubber and fibers, and the lugs are smaller and spaced farther apart.

The result is a tire that is lighter than the original model, has traction characteristics that are almost as good as the original but not quite, and is more susceptible to folding under on sidehills, and more likely to sag when the pressure is low and therefore to get sidewall cuts/punctures which are not repairable.

But it's all about varying degrees of these things, and is also dependent on how you ride.
I push my machines hard and expect them to bear up under the abuse. So I would not use the 2.0 model.
But if you ride less aggressively than me, then the 2.0 model might do fine for you.
Some people do fine with the stock floppies.

So you gotta determine how tough a tire you need, and how much steering resistance you're willing to put up with due to heavier tires, and make your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
That looked like a serious little hill.
For a sample of the kind of stuff I do with the Bighorns, go to about 2:45 in this video.

Failed Dune Hill Climb and Rocky Trail:
 

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Looks like a lot of fun! Mine climbed some dunes yesterday. The sand here may be different though and we've had a lot of rain lately. The little buggy will go! It did great on some small rock climbs too. Will need a good skid plate, put that on the list.
Back to topic though, I'm pretty sold on those tires!
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Every once in a while I wonder if I am missing out on something by sticking with Bighorns, and I do some forum searching. I read about the Sedona Ripsaw, which looks like a nice mean tire, but then I find people still having tire wobble problems due to mfg defects. Some like the Pit bulls, but they're even heavier.

Bottom line is you can't go wrong with a set of Bighorns.
Have fun out there!
 

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Stock Polaris 8 spoke front and rear rims,26x9x12 fronts, 26x11x12rear Duro Power Grip radials.Fit perfect and no rubbing.
 

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Fronts are 12x6 with 4+2 offset. Rears are 12x8 with 6+2 offset. Stock Polaris rims off of a RZR-S. I'd love to post a picture, I cant figure out how. I'd be glad to text you them .
 

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Discussion Starter #31
With stock wheels and stock size BigHorns you should stay under 50".
If you want to be REALLY sure, go with the same size tire all around (25x8x12) instead of putting wider ones on back.
 

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I can secondarily confirm that stock RZR S 800 aluminum wheels fit. (Thank you, gmck154x4!!) And, that ITP Holeshot ATR 26" tires fit, as well. Good light weight all terrain radial tire. These tires are what come stock on Can-Am Renegade (in 25" size).

FRONT:
1521106-458 12x6 (4+2)
Holeshot ATR 26x8-12

REAR:
1521161-458 12x8 (6+2)
Holeshot ATR 26x10-12

Overall width ended up right about 50", rear being slightly wider than front. So, a gain of about 1" over stock. These wheels do require tapered lug nuts.
 

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Briangade, any chance you could post a picture (maybe going through a 50" gate)? Thanks for you post!
I'll try to post up pics as soon as I can. Raining so dang much lately :apologetic: I don't think I'll be able to accomodate a gate, we really don't have them around here. But, I'll get a front and rear with a tape measure or something creative.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Best way I have found to measure tire width is to place a bottle of oil or whatever you have handy on the floor touching the outer sidewalls, and then put the ACE in neutral, push it out from between the bottles, and then measure the distance between them.

If you want to get overall width in case something is wider than the wheels/tires, seems like the same method using stakes or something in soft ground would work just as well.
 

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I try, as a general rule, not to pick fights on a brand new forum, even though it's great for driving up the post count quickly. :)
But, this is exactly what I asked people NOT to say.

You told me that the bolt pattern is 4/156, but you did not say where you got that number.
You told me you bought a set of rims with a 4+3 offset, but not whether you've installed them successfully.
You told me that it is the same as your Sportman 500, but not how you determined that.
So really, I have no confirmed information to go on.

But I bought an Ace today, and although the dealer was unable to provide that information on a timely basis, I took some wheels off and measured.

As illustrated by the photos below:
Bolt pattern is 4/156.
Wheel width looks like 7", give or take. That's a little tricky to get an exact measurement on.
Front wheel offset looks like 4.5+2.5.
Rear wheel offset looks like 5+2.

The good news: As the photos show, there're not a lot of wiggle room on the front, but 4+3 is pretty close, so it will probably be OK.
The bad news: Most of the aftermarket wheels are 4+3. That would add 2" to the wheel width. The only set of 5+2 wheels I found so far on RMATV are crazy expensive.

I just did a bit more measuring.
Polaris lists the overall width at 48", but they're lying a little. From sidewall to sidewall in the rear, it measures 49" at the rear and 47" at the front. The widest points are the tire sidewalls.
To get this measurement I put a tape measure on the ground as close to under the tire as I could get, put a yardstick up against the sidewalls, and nudged the tape measure until it lined up with the yardstick on one side.
Then I went to the other side, put the yardstick against the sidewalls, and lined it up with the tape measure again to get the measurement.

I also measured how far the sidewall sticks out from the wheel. It's 0.75" per side.
I noticed that the front sidewalls are roughly flush with the wheels. So if I go with 8" tires in the back instead of the stock 10", I might narrow it by 1.5".
But if I widen it by 2" by putting a 4+3 offset on there, that's a net widening of 0.5".
Digging up one of your old threads here Scoundrel

Looks like you spent the time to understand what offsets will rub and how to keep the Ace close to factory spec

What rim width and offset would you suggest if I was to go for:
Front ITP Dunestar 26x9-12 (1" taller and 1" wider than stock)
Rear CST Abuzz 25x10-12 (same size as stock)

edited. Looks like 12x7, 4+3 wheels are the most common and reasonably priced. Do people usually get four the same even with the rears tires being up to 3" wider than the rim and 2" wider than standard front tires?
 

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I did specifically so that the tire would sit on the rim uniformly, and so that I could carry a spare for either front or rear
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I believe the stock wheels are 12x6 in front and 12x8 in back. A 4+3 offset will not maintain the ACE's stock width. You'll probably end up at 50" in front and 52" in back.
12x7 wheels with 4+3 offset will hold 26x9x12 tires just fine. 25x10x12 will probably fit that wheel just fine as well, though there may be more sidewall bulge than you want.
However, you have to be careful about mixing tire heights. If the tires are too much different, it will mess with the AWD system's calculations about when to kick in due to slippage.
Unfortunately, tire height is hard to figure before you buy, because different manufacturers and even different sizes within the same model can have variances, so the advertised tire height is not always true.
Also, the width of the wheel will factor into the tire height. A 25x10x12 tire that normally goes into a 12x8 wheel might be a little taller in a 12x7 wheel.

For example:
I tried a set of 26x9x12 Trilobite tires that are actually 25" high, and they rubbed in reverse with the wheel turned.
But a set of 26x9x12 BigHorns that measured 25.5" high did not rub, even though they were taller.

I wish I could tell you exactly what will not rub, and keep you stock width, but there are way too many variables.

If you want to maintain stock width, swap the tires but keep your stock wheels, or buy some nicer stock wheels from some other Polaris model that you like. Not all of them will fit so you have to be careful there too.

I like going with the same width all around for the same reason as Mungo; one spare fits all. I have not had any negative effects from using skinnier tires in the rear. It might have some tiny amount less traction, but that only matters if you ride in such a way that you need every last bit of traction, all of the time - mudding, for example. Mostly, people like the wider rear tires for that beefy look.
 
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